Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Week 8 2068 Preview

Mitakihara harrow Tennessee, 92-24

Mitakihara harrow Tennessee, 92-24

By Chelia Blendy
The Daily Magi
October 6, 2068

Quarterback Terry Miyanaga passed for 315 yards and three touchdowns and ran for 66 yards and two more majors as Tatsuya Kaname's Mitakihara Magi obliterated the Tennessee Volunteers, 92-24, at the Sakura Bowl on Saturday. Halfback Jonathan White Cross ran for 134 yards and two touchdowns, halfback Clay Robinson ran for 96 yards and backup quarterback Russ Opare passed for 108 yards and a score while rushing for 59 yards and a touchdown.

Wide receiver Steve Takakamo caught seven passes for 149 yards and three touchdowns, wideout George Griffin caught four passes for 87 yards and wideout Shane Balogun caught three passes for 51 yards. Left guard Sean Scott had 14 pancakes while right guard Brandon Freeman and left guard Caleb Brown each had 13 pancakes.

Middle linebacker Danny Miyanaga led the defense with 11 tackles and an interception while cornerback Brian Pitts had seven tackles and two picks. Right end Harry Atago and defensive tackle Kent Nanase each had two sacks while cornerback Victor Ejide added five tackles and another interception.

Mitakihara improve to 7-0 and return to action next week against the USC Trojans.


Sunday, April 13, 2014

The Mystique of the Montreal Hot Dog



The Mystique of the Montreal Hot Dog

By Chelia Blendy
The Daily Magi
October 3, 2068

The Montreal hot dog is one of several variations of hot dogs served as a fast food staple at restaurants and diners in Montreal and other parts of Quebec.

In Montreal (and elsewhere in the province of Quebec), the hot dog buns generally used in restaurants are top loading (New England style) hot dog buns, rather than the side loading hot dog buns generally used in other parts of Canada. Montreal hot dogs are considered to be rather small and are generally sold for between $0.50 and $1.00 depending on the area of purchase and dressing. Popular brands include Lesters, Lafleur’s, and Glatt's kosher.

The city of Montreal has not permitted street food carts since 1947, leading to a proliferation of small “greasy spoon” restaurants which are variations on the classic Québécois casse-croute (snack-type) restaurants. These restaurants serve hot dogs with fresh-cut fries (patates frites, often served “very brown and greasy”), poutine, hamburgers, pogos (corn dogs), hamburger steaks, in addition to Greek dishes (typically souvlaki and gyro), pizza, and smoked meat. Restaurant chains known for their hot dogs include La Belle Province, Valentine, and Lafleur Restaurants. One longstanding Montreal independent restaurant that offers hot dogs is the Montreal Pool Room.

Hot dogs may either be steamé (also stimé), referred to in English as "Steamies", a name which was briefly used by an Ontario chain (affiliated with the La Belle Province chain), which are fresh from the steamer and rather soft, or toasté (referred to in English as "Toasties"), which are grilled or toasted until crisp. Toastés are slightly more expensive and are less popular.

Local hot dogs generally come dressed three ways:


  • All-dressed (Montreal Style): This hotdog, nicknamed a 'steamie', is topped with mustard, chopped onion, and fresh coleslaw or plain chopped cabbage (sauerkraut or coleslaw of the creamy variety is rarely used). All-dressed typically does not include ketchup, which must be requested specifically. Relish is also usually available, but in the oldest hot-doggeries, e.g., the Montreal Pool Room (now Le vieux Montreal Pool Room), "all-dressed" still means without relish.
  • Michigan hot dog: This hot dog is topped with meat chili sauce or spaghetti sauce. It can be served with or without diced onions and mustard.
  • Supreme: The hot dog is topped with cheese and bacon. This variation comes from Lafleur Restaurants.

The Mystique of Richtree Market



The Mystique of Richtree Market

By Chelia Blendy
The Daily Magi
October 2, 2068

Richtree Market is a Canadian restaurant chain, which approximates the style of a European market. Richtree Market Restaurants Inc. operates market-style, open-kitchen restaurants. The company has three owned-and-operated locations in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and one in Thornhill, Ontario, Canada. Franchises exist in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, and Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The chain offers casual dining and takeout service, with limited grocery stores and special items for children. Menu items are inspired by foods of Europe and Asia.

Locations seat approximately 50 people.

A larger, downtown-Toronto location, at Brookfield Place (formerly BCE Place), went out of business in January, 2010. A similar restaurant, which opened in the location after Richtree's closure, is owned by competing Swiss chain Mövenpick Marché and is unrelated.

Richtree has announced plans to open one new location in Chicago, Illinois, in the Westfield Old Orchard Mall. It would be the chain's first venture outside of Canada. Richtree prohibits customers from using cameras in its dining rooms.

The Mystique of Caribou



The Mystique of Caribou

By Chelia Blendy
The Daily Magi
October 1, 2068

Caribou is a sweet Québécois alcoholic beverage composed of red wine, hard liquor, usually whisky, and maple syrup or sugar.Caribou is supposed to have derived its name from a drink consisting of a mix of caribou blood and whisky which was drunk by hunters and loggers in colonial times to stave off the cold when working.

Caribou can be made at home but is now available as a premixed beverage by the Société des alcools du Québec. It can be consumed hot or cold depending on the weather and served with citrus and cinnamon in the manner of mulled wine. Cloves and nutmeg are also commonly added to flavour the drink. The beverage has numerous variations but it is usually made by mixing:


  • Red wine or port
  • Hard liquor (usually white) generally whisky, brandy or rum

These two are usually combine with a proportion of 75% to 25%, respectively, and sweetened with maple syrup or sugar as desired.

The drink has been traditionally served at the Quebec Winter Carnival, where it is carried around by carnival goers in hollow plastic walking canes or drunk at outdoor bars at the event. More recently it is now drunk in celebration on the National holiday of Quebec. It is also a staple of the Festival du Voyageur in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where it is sometimes served in glasses made out of ice.