Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Season's Greetings...


Season's Greetings from
The Mitakihara Magi Football Dynasty.

Monday, October 20, 2014

RONA MTSC Roses: E-sports Lives Here



RONA MTSC Roses: E-sports Lives Here

By Tami Nishimikado
The Daily Magi
August 21, 2073

E-sports has taken time to find its footing in Mitakihara Town, but the Mitakihara Town Sports Club has made significant strides to incorporate it as part of the city's sporting fabric.



Founded in February 2040 by a French-Korean mahjong professional, the late Choe Myeong Hwa, and sanctioned as a wing of the Mitakihara Town Sports Club in April of that year, the MTSC Roses are an all-female corps of professional e-sports gamers from Western Canada who are trained by former gamer professionals from Asia and Europe and who play a variety of online games competitively year-round. The money gained is primarily used to fund for future college expenditures, though some who play past the mandated retirement age of 25 play competitively under the team MTSC Roses Plus, albeit for reduced salaries and for smaller, regional tournaments.

"My wish was for this city to take e-sports seriously as other sports, since mahjong is not strong enough to be considered popular here," Choe said in an interview in 2041. (She passed away in 2055.) "It has taken time for Roses to grow into a strong professional team, but over time it will get there and win tournaments on a consistent basis."

Arguably, the most successful team among the Roses is the League of Legends team, of which the MTSC Roses, sponsored by RONA since 2041, are known around the world for. They entered the North American League of Legends Service in 2041 and within five years, entered the Challenger Series, for which they remained until 2050, when the RONA MTSC Roses were promoted into the League of Legends Championship Series.

From that point on, the door bust wide open. The Roses would go on to become the first-ever highly successful all-female League of Legends team. In 2050, they would defeat teams like Team SoloMid, Cloud9 and LMQ to advance to their first-ever League of Legends World Championship. But they would suffer hurdles along the way, as they were schooled by the likes of Star Horn Royal Club. OMG, SK Telecom T1 and the giants, Samsung Galaxy White.



Years of making it to Worlds but coming up short would pass before the first-ever team of players created the dynasty that would stand to this day, in 2062. The 2062 version of the RONA MTSC Roses, comprising of Elena "Em" Mochizuki, Raimu "SoWhat" Nejikawa, Isuzu "Suzy" Shiranui, Fumio "Flame" Murakami and Kokomi "Coke" Shiina, stormed their way to the World Championship Final, demolishing the once-invincible Samsung Galaxy White to bring the Summoners' Cup to Canada for the first-time in history.



The lineups have changed since then, but the glories have not. This year's team, composed of Claire "Oktober" Rouge, Ellis "Heater" Fahrengart, Fianna Ray "Freo" Ordessia, Rinslet "Rilla" Laurenfrost and Terminus "EndGame" Est, is arguably the most dominant RONA MTSC Roses side to ever don the iconic pink shirt and white Daisy Dukes (known locally as the Pink and Daisies). Installing the uptempo, high-pace, high-intensity style of play from the Korean powerhouses, the Roses finished every contest on an average of 26 minutes, with only three games going past 29 minutes.

"It's not easy to be a professional LoL player but as athletes, we visualize the battle, envision the playing ground and instill the belief in fighting for each other," said Oktober, the designated captain of the side. "We are very good at what we do because we've spent a good deal of our time in this game."

Rilla believes the same way.

"I believe the playing field has changed dramatically ever since we broke the Asian deadlock and gave Canada its first-ever Summoners' Cup years ago," she said. "All of a sudden, everyone wants to take us apart but we are all happy being here in M-Town and playing for everybody in Canada. The E-sports scene is growing and its because of us that we're raising the bar."

"I want to put on my resume that I won the Summoner's Cup and schooled our main global rival, Samsung White," said EndGame. "Then afterwards I can do my best...to cheer the losers up. But I won't give away my secrets."

"Playing League of Legends professionally is like playing tennis or soccer or field hockey or even running cross country: you need to answer its calling and embrace it," said Freo. "For us, this is our calling, this is our job, and we want to win because we want to make our families proud and we can take care of ourselves. We won't play this professionally forever, but since we're employees of the Sport Club, we do take our job seriously."

"This year's finals will take place at BC Place and I hear it's going to be a sellout if we make it to the final," said Heater. "It's nice to not have to play in Los Angeles for once. It's too small. We like to play in front of big crowds because to us, playing E-sports is a bloody big deal. So if Korea or China or Europe wants our Summoner's Cup, you're gonna have to deal with the best girl power the world has ever seen."



In addition to the Roses, Mitakihara Town Sports Club has a men's e-sports branch, called the Tim Hortons MTSC Clovers. However, they have failed to earn the same success as the Roses, though with time, that may change.


Thursday, October 2, 2014

2014.10.3.




We walked forward as we gently
 and carefully held onto the warmth of our inseparable hearts.
 We can change the future with our words
 and with my wish that has yet to get an answer.
My ideal self I dreamt of being when I was a child
 is still far from me, but if you’re with me,
 I feel I can become a bit stronger
 and repaint tomorrow with new colors.
Following the hope we called for,
 we overcome the world which has come to a halt
 and one day, because we didn’t give up, our hearts will become one.
 Crying or laughing, let’s welcome the new tomorrow.
 Even if the vow we’ve settled on is painful and strikes me down,
 it’s so I can protect your heart.
Within the flow of time of no memories,
 I’m sure there lies the warmth we search for.
 When we get embraced by it, everything
 and all my feelings will circle around you.
We held hands and ran as we faced the sky
 and held many precious lights in our hearts.
 It becomes the radiance within me
 and clears away of all of my hesitations.
We break free from a complicated labyrinth with no exit.
 The tears you shed woke my heart
 and I realized the world I knew so well still had many beautiful sides.
 New possibilities are born
 from a wish of a moment in time.
Believing in salvation, I made up my mind.
 Standing at the beginning of it all,
 I’ll bring back your smile
 and become a real miracle.

Following the hope we called for,
 we overcome the world which has come to a halt
 and one day, because we didn’t give up, our hearts will become one.
 Crying or laughing, let’s welcome the new tomorrow.
 Even if the vow we’ve settled on is painful and strikes me down,
 it’s so I can protect your heart.
I’ll stay by your side.

Happy Birthday, Madoka Kaname.


Wednesday, September 10, 2014

"Westwood is a true college community": John Kirigaya

"Westwood is a true college community": John Kirigaya

By Chiyo Sakura
The Daily Bruins
August 15, 2073

UCLA Bruins freshman halfback John Kirigaya won the starting position at tailback and is poised to do big things. It isn't the championships that UCLA's sports teams have won that attracted Johnno, as he is know in Mitakihara Town, Canada. And it isn't the Rose Bowl Stadium that was the icing on the cake. Well, it is, but it's not the reason why Johnno is a Bruin.

The answer is under your nose and my nose and everyone else's nose: it's the experience that makes Kirigaya a proud Bruin.

"I like Westwood," he said after practice at Drake Stadium. "Westwood is a true college community. Here on this campus, everybody pushes everyone else to be better and do better to make the university better. You have players who can play and players who can succeed in the classroom.

"I got some really good roommates from the women's volleyball team that I spend time playing video games with and getting a good night's rest with really cute girls is my cup of tea. So I don't get bored; I always get motivated to be super, to be a star. I haven't shown the nation that I can be a great player because everyone knows the work I did at Mitakihara Secondary.

"All the detractors wonder if that's just smoke and mirrors. They wonder if I'm really all that's cracked up to be. I'm ready to show America that I am here, and I am ready to get to work because that's what I came here to do."

Sunday, July 20, 2014

John Kirigaya Picks UCLA

John Kirigaya Picks UCLA

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
February 2, 2073

At Taniguchi Hall at Mitakihara Town Secondary School yesterday, a major press conference took place. There were four hats on a rose table. Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya was to choose a hat. Four schools had made the shortlist: Stanford, UCLA, USC and Notre Dame. Fans from all four schools flocked to Mitakihara Town to witness this event. The students were surprised that college football fans from the States would descend on their campus, when normally they would be at their jobs.

"I couldn't believe that there were diehard fans making a trip here in the middle of February," said Kirigaya before they even began. "They must have a lot of money riding on my decision, so it looks like there are going to be a lot of disappointed people. I really wished they just watched it on TV to save money, but that the way it goes with these fans. They love the sport and they have a really strong investment in it, so good on them."

The voice on the tannoy, Chester Hong Cheong asked, "Hanato Kirigaya, which school will you choose?" 10 seconds later, Kirigaya picked...UCLA.  The UCLA fans were belated, and some of the USC fans jeered and also delivered some unsavory language and even throw bottles towards Kirigaya. The degenerates that were in attendance were summarily escorted out and arrested for their actions.

"Well, I knew I was going to make a lot of people unhappy with my decision," said Kirigaya, who will choose the number 49 as his jersey number. "But, what's done is done, and I am ready for action in Westwood."

In other news, the Mitakihara Magi have elected to move down to Division I FCS as an independent. The Magi finished 10-3 and won the Sun Bowl under head coach Akiyuki Kaname.

Mitakihara Angels Defeat Lord Tweedsmuir, 69-7, Win Subway Bowl

Mitakihara Angels Defeat Lord Tweedsmuir, 69-7, Win Subway Bowl

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 26, 2072

Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels are once again the best high school football team all of British Columbia. At BC Place in Vancouver, B.C., halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya put on a masterpiece of a performance, carrying the ball 18 times for 401 yards and nine touchdowns to give MiTSS a 69-7 victory over the Lord Tweedsmuir Panthers. The Angels conclude the season with a record of 15-0.

The win is Coach Landry's 175th of the season and his seventh BC High School Senior AAA Championship. Coach Landry won titles in '61, '62, '63, '65, '67, and '69 before the '72 championship, ending a three-year drought. Now the major question on everybody's mind is going to be where Kirigaya decides to commit to. He's earned scholarships at all the schools that want to take a chance on him but where will he go?

Kirigaya himself claims to not have the answer, however, an unidentified source has hinted that the University of Southern California, or USC will be hitting the jackpot. If this is the case, Kirigaya joins an elite list of running back to play for the Trojans. Kirigaya's family and Mitakihara Town Secondary School have stressed that the decision will be made official at Taniguchi Hall, the school gymnasium, on February 1, 2073.

Odds placed by 5dimes.com have placed USC as the odds-on favorite for Kirigaya's signature. However, there are a number of other schools in the Pac-12, Big 12, Big Ten, ACC and SEC that have a chance at landing Johnno on their roster next year. A celebration dinner buffet and awards ceremony in honour of the 2072 Mitakihara Angels Football Team will take place on Dec. 25 at Tsukino Centre on the campus of Mitakihara University. Tickets go on sale for $30 and all proceeds will go towards the Angel Wings, the official booster club of MiTSS Athletics.

Mitakihara face Lord Tweedsmuir In Subway Bowl

Mitakihara face Lord Tweedsmuir In Subway Bowl

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 23, 2072

Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels conclude their season with the Subway Bowl, the B.C. School Sports Provincial AAA Championship against the Lord Tweedsmuir Panthers, who come into the contest with a record of 11-1. MiTSS is 14-0 and is the top prep team in the province, led by its electrifying halfback/left outside linebacker, John Kirigaya.

Prior to the playoffs, Tweedy suffered defeats in regular season play to the Rick Hansen Hurricanes and the Hugh Boyd Trojans. However, it was discovered by B.C. School Sports that the Hurricanes and Trojans fielded ineligible players in their victories over the Panthers. As a result, Tweedy was awarded 2-0 victories over Hansen and Boyd and they also steamrolled over their player opponents this year, which featured all-star teams from Calgary and Edmonton, as well as Vancouver College.

"Lord Tweedsmuir is a really good team we're facing," said Coach Landry prior to practice at the school's athletic field. "They gave us a test on the road at their house and they want to pull off a shocker that will reverberate around here for a long time. However, our boys are on a mission: they want to win the provincial title. They want to head to Subway after the game and feast on some Veggie Delites on whole wheat, because, you know, this is the Subway Bowl.

"We're not taking Tweedy lightly. We're going to head into BC Place hungry to take back what is ours. We're not going to settle for second this Saturday. Everyone at Madoka is pulling for us to win the provincial title. I promise you, we will prevail, we will survive, and we will do in with style. Johnno is looking forward to making this game his statement game, and the others are looking to push MiTSS to the finish line. This is going to be epic. You don't want to miss this."

Mitakihara Qualify For Subway Bowl In 90-0 Shutout Of New Westminster

Mitakihara Qualify For Subway Bowl In 90-0 Shutout Of New Westminster

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 19, 2072

At New Westminster Secondary School in New Westminster, B.C., Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels shut out the New Westminster Hyacks, 90-0, in the semifinals of the 2072 BC School Sports Provincial AAA Football Tournament. Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya returned a punt 30 yards for a touchdown, returned a recovered fumble eight yards for a major and ran for 351 yards and 10 rushing touchdowns.

"The only issue I had with our performance tonight was our passing game," said Coach Landry after the game. "We only threw the ball, I think, just twice all game and both of them are incompletions. I think our boys needs to realize that we don't have to rely on Johnno to get points, even though he will give us points any way he can. We need to look at other options and have a balanced attack.

"Craig (Ostrander), Thien (Nguyen), Bill (Wilson), Steve (Merka)...those guys need to step in up when we head to BC Place next week. We have all to play for and I don't want to be disappointed when we get on the field. Now the pressure is on. Now there is no turning back. Our boys will be ready. Everyone's excited, but there is one more game to go."

The Subway Bowl will be broadcast on Radio Madoka and CMDO 89.5 FM. MiTSS improve to 14-0 for the year.

The Mystique of the British Columbia Penitentiary

The Mystique of the British Columbia Penitentiary

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 16, 2072

The British Columbia Penitentiary (BC Penitentiary, commonly referred to as the BC Pen and the Pen) was a federal maximum security prison located in New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada. The BC Penitentiary operated for 102 years, from 1878 until it was decommissioned in 1980. It was the first federal penal institution west of Manitoba. After British Columbia joined confederation in 1871 and with the population of western Canada increasing, the need for a federal prison in western Canada became apparent. The fact that the transcontinental railroad had not yet been constructed made transporting prisoners long distances east to other federal institutions costly and difficult, which further exacerbated this need.

Planning and construction for the BC Penitentiary began in 1874. The site selected was a hillside overlooking the Fraser River in the Sapperton neighbourhood of New Westminster. The prison received its first inmates in 1878 and opened without fanfare.

The buildings and structures that made up the BC Penitentiary site were added gradually. The original complex comprised the main gate house and a few brick and wooden buildings. The large cell blocks, which housed most of the inmates, were constructed between 1904 and 1914.

BC Penitentiary was replete with structural problems when it opened, including flooding of the basement, faulty plumbing and heating, bars either missing from windows or not properly affixed to the walls, and the lack of proper medical facilities. Major repairs and renovations were conducted over several years to remedy these issues, with most of the work performed by inmate work crews.

The site was initially fenced by a wooden fence, which was soon upgraded to 30-foot rock walls, and finally 40-foot concrete walls. Guard towers were located on each corner. Until 1961, the prison incorporated a farm, located across the street from the penitentiary, where some inmates would be assigned to work. The farm produced a sizeable portion of the food used use in the institution’s kitchen. The farm was economically viable into the late 1950s. However, increasing costs of its operation, decreasing costs of buying food from outside sources, the perceived decline in the usefulness of providing agricultural training to inmates, and the increasing urbanization of the surrounding area, led to the decision to close the farm and sell the farmland to the City of New Westminster.

Staffing requirements increased over time in accordance with standards dictated by the Canadian Penitentiary Service. They were 171 in the mid-1950s, and had increased to 363 in 1976, despite a decrease in the prison population during this period. BC Penitentiary experienced severe overcrowding starting in the 1950s holding as many as 765 prisoners in 1958. The Canadian Penitentiary Service attempted to alleviate this by transferring inmates to other institutions, such as the recently opened William Head Institution. By the mid-1960s, the population had been reduced to around 500 inmates.[13] However, this did not prevent the series of violent riots and hostage-takings that plagued BC Penitentiary in its final years.

On March 12, 1979, Correctional Service of Canada announced that British Columbia Penitentiary would close. Inmates were gradually transferred to Kent Institution, with the last inmate leaving on February 15, 1980. For two weeks in May, 1980, the prison was opened to the public for the first time; over 80,000 attended the open house. Although BC Penitentiary had opened with no ceremony or fanfare whatever 102 years earlier, a formal ceremony, attended by various dignitaries, was held to mark its closing on May 10, 1980.[ Most of the buildings on the former BC Pen site have been demolished and replaced by residential housing and parkland. Only four parts of the original prison still remain: the Gatehouse (which is now a sports bar), the Coal House, the original Centre Block (which has been converted to offices), and the cemetery.

Mitakihara Slam Door Shut On John Barsby, 75-6

Mitakihara Slam Door Shut On John Barsby, 75-6

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 12, 2072

In the second round of the B.C. School Sports Provincial AAA Football Tournament, Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels crushed Ben Tomko's John Barsby Bulldogs in the second meeting between these two teams, 75-6 at John Barsby Community School in Mitakihara Town, B.C. Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya ran for 316 yards, caught two passes for 40 yards, scored eight total touchdowns and had a open field tackle for loss on defense.

Third-year kickoff returner Andres Cantor, the great-grandson of the legendary football announcer, returned a kickoff 78 yards for a touchdown to set the tempo of the game. Cornerback Ben Ramsour also returned an interception 31 yards for a touchdown in the second half. To Barsby's credit, they did score a touchdown on a 50-yard pass, but that was all they could muster, as the MiTSS Angels countered with 27 straight unanswered points.

"We're halfway there," said Coach Landry after the game. "We're now in the final four of high school football in our province but we're not finished yet. We need to keep working hard, keep refining our game and we'll be at BC Place in two weeks time for the provincial championship. The boys will need to keep their feet on the ground and get ready for our next opponent."

Mitakihara improve to 13-0 on the year.

"Aw, Not These Guys Again!": Ben Tomko

"Aw, Not These Guys Again!": Ben Tomko

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 8, 2072

Ben Tomko, a former left guard/center for the Wilfrid Laurier Golden Hawks and the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, is in his seventh season as the head coach of the John Barsby Bulldogs. When he heard the news that the Bulldogs were facing Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels in the second round of the B.C. School Sports Provincial AAA Football Tournament, he was sick to his stomach. Literally.

"Aw, not these guys again! I can't believe we're facing them again, but that's what it all boils down to," said Coach Tomko from his office on campus at John Barsby Community School in Mitakihara. "You all know what happened to us in August: we were taken to the cleaners by the Angels and they ripped us apart. I don't know if we have a chance to get a better result against MiTSS, they have so much talent.

"I will be very honest with you: if we had that guy, John Kirigaya, on our team, we'd be having the best season in Dawgs football in years. He brings so much to his team: the grace of a halfback, the hands of a tight end, the tackling power of a linebacker...and he comes from a strong family of football players and coaches. We're gonna give it our best shot, but if we lose, we think we've lost to the eventual Subway Bowl champions."

MiTSS take on Barsby at John Barsby Community School this Saturday. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. and will be televised by Radio Madoka 2 and CMTS AM 900.

St. Catherines-Niagara All-Stars Can't Stop Kirigaya, MiTSS

St. Catherines-Niagara All-Stars Can't Stop Kirigaya, MiTSS

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 5, 2072

The St. Catherine-Niagara All-Stars, nicknamed the Bolts, are an all-star team composed of the best prep athletes from the St. Catherines-Niagara Metropolitan Area. They were placed in the BC School Sports Provincial AAA Football Tournament as an invitee. Turns out, they were given a rude welcoming by Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels, and their ace, halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya.

Kirigaya ran for 229 yards, caught three passes for 35 yards, scored seven offensive touchdowns, had two tackles and also recorded an interception as the Angels flew past the Bolts, 72-0, at Mitakihara Stadium and Tatsuya Kaname Field in Mitakihara Town, B.C. The Angels improve to 12-0 on the season and advance to the second round of the playoffs.

"We want to take it one game at a time," said Coach Landry after the game. "We are two wins away from the Subway Bowl, and everybody knows that the best teams in B.C. and also Canada, will get their best shot against us. So we need to be ready."

The Mystique of St. Catharines, Part 2

The Mystique of St. Catharines, Part 2

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 4, 2072

The Merritt family arrived after this time, among the later Loyalists to relocate following the American Revolution. They were from the Carolinas, New York state and New Brunswick. In 1796, Thomas Merritt arrived to build on his relationship with his former Commander and Queen's Ranger, John Graves Simcoe, now the Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada.

At an unknown early date, an inn was built by Thomas Adams on the east side of what is now Ontario Street. It became a community meeting place, election centre, stagecoach stop, and mail delivery deposit. This was preceded by the church and a log school house completed before 1797, all located on the east bank of the 12 Mile Creek at the extreme west end of the what was known at that time as Main Street. This was an extension of the old Iroquois Trail and was renamed St. Paul Street by the settlers and descendant by the mid-19th century. Several mills, salt works, numerous retail outlets, a ship building yard, distillery and various other businesses were developed next.

The first Welland Canal was constructed from 1824 to 1833 behind what is now known as St. Paul Street, using Twelve Mile and Dick's Creek. William Hamilton Merritt worked to promote the ambitious venture, both by raising funds and by enlisting government support. The canal established St. Catharines as the hub of commerce and industry for the Niagara Peninsula.

Merritt also played a role in making St. Catharines a center of abolitionist activity. In 1855, the British Methodist Episcopal Church, Salem Chapel was established at the corner of Geneva and North streets, on land granted to the congregation by Merritt in the early 1840s. The area became known to refugee slaves from the United States as a place of "refuge and rest"; it was a destination, one of the final stops in Canada on the Underground Railroad for refugee African-American slaves. By the mid-1850s the town's population was about 6000, 800 of whom were "of African descent". St. Catharines remains an important place in Black Canadian history.

The Town of St. Catharines was incorporated in 1845. St. Catharines was incorporated as a city in 1876. The St. Catharines Armoury is a recognized Federal Heritage building, #1991 on the Register of the Government of Canada Heritage Buildings.

The Mystique of St. Catharines, Part 1

The Mystique of St. Catharines, Part 1

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
November 3, 2072

St. Catharines (2071 population 151,800; metropolitan population 395,207) is the largest city in Canada's Niagara Region and the sixth largest urban area in Ontario, with 96.11 square kilometres of land. It lies in Southern Ontario, 51 kilometres (32 mi) south of Toronto across Lake Ontario, and is 19 kilometres (12 mi) inland from the international boundary with the United States along the Niagara River. It is the northern entrance of the Welland Canal. Residents of St. Catharines are known as St. Cathariners. St. Catharines carries the official nickname "The Garden City" due to its 1,000 acres (4 km2) of parks, gardens and trails.

St. Catharines is situated in an area for commerce and trade since it is located between the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and the Fort Erie - US Border. Manufacturing is the city's dominant industry, as noted by the heraldic motto, "Industry and Liberality". General Motors of Canada, Ltd., the Canadian subsidiary of General Motors, was the city's largest employer, a distinction now held by the District School Board of Niagara. TRW Automotive operates a plant in the city, though in recent years employment there has shifted from heavy industry and manufacturing to services.

St. Catharines lies on one of the main telecommunications backbones between Canada and the United States, and as a result a number of call centres operate in the city.

The city was first settled by Loyalists in the 1780s. The Crown granted them land in compensation for their services and for losses in the United States. Early histories credit Serjeant Jacob Dittrick and Private John Hainer, formerly of Butler's Rangers, as among the first to come to the area. They took their Crown Patents where Dick’s Creek and 12 Mile Creek merge, now the city centre of St. Catharines. Although never documented, some local St. Catharines historians speculate that Dick’s Creek was named after Richard Pierpoint, a Black Loyalist and former American slave. Secondary to water routes, native trails provided transportation networks, resulting in the present-day radial road pattern from the City centre. The surrounding land was surveyed and Townships created between 1787 and 1789.

After the Butler’s Rangers disbanded in 1784 and settled the area, Duncan Murray as a former Quartermaster in the 84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants) was appointed by the Crown to distribute free Government supplies (victuals) for 2 years to the resettled Loyalists. He did this from his mill, built on the 12 Mile Creek in Power Glen. After his death in 1786, his holdings were forfeited to merchant Robert Hamilton of Queenston.

Hamilton tried to operate for profit the already well-established Murray’s Distribution Centre and Mill under the management of his cousin. Among other ventures, Hamilton became land wealthy, expropriating lands from subsistence Loyalist settlers who were incapable of settling their debts. Murray’s distribution centre, later Hamilton’s warehouse, and its location have long been a mystery. Hamilton’s major profits were derived from transhipping supplies for the military and civic establishments from his Queenston enterprise, not from charitably supplying the subsistence Loyalist settlers. Hamilton lacked interest in social development and sold his business to Jesse Thompson before the turn of the 18th century.

The small settlement was known as “The Twelve” and as “Murray’s District” to military and civic officials, but the local residents in 1796 and earlier referred to it as St. Catharines. This is confirmed in St. Catharines’ first history, written by J.P. Merritt: “to be historically accurate the name St. Catharines preceded all of these….”

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Mitakihara Enter Playoffs As No. 1 Seed Following 63-0 Win Over Mount Douglas

Mitakihara Enter Playoffs As No. 1 Seed Following 63-0 Win Over Mount Douglas

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 29, 2072

Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels enter the BC School Sports Provincial AAA Playoffs as the No. 1 seed following a 63-0 shutout win over the Mount Douglas Rams on Sagitta Luminis Day 2072 at Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium in Mitakihara Town, B.C. Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya ran for 308 yards and six touchdowns while wide receiver Thien Nguyen had three touchdown catches from quarterback Steve Merka.

MiTSS reduced Mt. Doug to just -5 yards rushing and only 62 yards of total offense. In addition to the big playmaking ability from Kirigaya, the pass rush also contributed to the blowout, led by defensive tackle Kolbe "Eggman" Launchbaugh. After the game, Coach Landry came under scrutiny for allegedly playing a soft schedule. He fired back in kind with some tough talk.

"Many of these teams have pretty good players," Coach Landry told the press. "We have good teams face us, but the reason we win big is because of Johnno. Take him off the field, and your opinion of this being a soft schedule changes, doesn't it? Johnno makes it softer than soft serve but that doesn't mean we change our tune when we get on the field. No matter who the opponent, we go out there and show everyone what we're about. Period."

Mitakihara conclude the regular season 11-0 and await their first-round opponent in the playoffs.

Sagitta Luminis Day 2072 Honours Class Of 2073



Sagitta Luminis Day 2072 Honours Class Of 2073

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 25, 2072

Mitakihara University has its Magia Day game, celebrating the fourth-year students of the Class of 2073. At Mitakihara Town Secondary School, there is an equivalent for the graduating third-years, called Sagitta Luminis Day, or SagLum for short. Sagitta Luminis means "Arrow Of Light," one of the key mysteries of the university's co-founder, Dr. Madoka Kaname. SagLum '72 will honour student-athletes of the MiTSS Class of 2073.

The opponent for Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels are their bitter rivals, the Mount Douglas Rams, who are having a terrible season at 2-8. With no playoffs to play for, this is essentially their championship game. The coach of the Rams, Gabe Sawchuk, was fired and dismissed from the school five weeks ago for an incident involving members of the cheer team, who told Coach Sawchuk to fix a number of matches in exchange for payments and sex. Those cheer members are also expelled from the school and are currently doing community service and undergoing therapy. Gabe's brother Danny is currently the interim head coach.

But despite the tumultuous season at Mt. Doug, that has not been a distraction for MiTSS, who are seeing fans come to Mitakihara Stadium to see John Kirigaya and his playmaking ability. Sure, there are other notable players like Thien Nguyen, Steve Merka and Craig Ostrander, but they pale in comparison to Kirigaya's pedigree and exciting runs. He is considered a celebrity at the school, along with his fiancee Yanagi Takayama.

The winner of the Angels-Rams game plays for the Rebellion Window, a three-foot window weighing 35 pounds, held together with a silk ribbon, bedecked with pink and purple gems representing Angels and Rams victories. It was donated by the Homulilly Society and this Saturday, two members of the Society will be present, barefoot in their characteristic funeral dresses, to award the Window.

"We know Mt. Doug have been having it rough this year, but that's their issue, not ours," said Kirigaya. "We're just gonna be focused on making our parents proud and watching me and the other third-years play one more exciting game for our fans and our classmates. Everyone that has been behind us this year, thank you, and we're gonna repay you by putting on a show this weekend against the Rams."

Kickoff is scheduled for Oct. 29 at 7 p.m. PT and will be televised by Radio Madoka 2 and broadcast on CMTS AM 900.

MiTSS Pass Defense A Big Issue As Angels Zoom Past Terry Fox, 69-6

MiTSS Pass Defense A Big Issue As Angels Zoom Past Terry Fox, 69-6

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 22, 2072

If there is one thing that Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels are poor at, it's pass defense. The Terry Fox Ravens, now 1-9, scored their only touchdown on a long 76-yard pass that got Coach Landry riled up. Upending a few tables, Coach Landry told the players to get John Kirigaya, the Angels' star halfback/left outside linebacker, the ball immediately to counter the poor pass defense.

It worked. Kirigaya ran for 314 yards and eight touchdowns and quarterback Steve Merka also passed for 130 yards and two more scores as the Angels flew past the Ravens, 69-6. This has been one of the worst seasons in Terry Fox Ravens football history, and even though that big play did bring a smile to the face of the long-suffering Ravens boosters, it fired up the Angels, who responded with 48 unanswered points and a relentless pass rush. The Angels reduced the Ravens to -35 yards rushing and just 131 yards of total offense, all from the pass.

"Everybody talks about Johnno and his important to the team but we have other players besides Kirigaya, like Thien Nguyen, Craig Ostrander, Bill Wilson and Steve Merka, all of who are going to play CIS ball for UBC," said Coach Landry after the match. "Getting those players touches forces opponents to focus on the entire team, rather that just Johnno, and makes us more complete in our attack. However, we need to address giving up big plays to any opponent. We plan to work on our pass defense next week."

Mitakihara improve to 10-0 and will conclude the regular season with a match at home against the Mount Douglas Rams in Sagitta Luminis Day 2072, honoring the third-year students of the MiTSS Class of 2073. That match will be broadcast by Radio Madoka 2 and CMTS AM 900.

The Mystique of Terry Fox Secondary School

The Mystique of Terry Fox Secondary School

By Touko Fukami
The Daily MiTSS
October 19, 2072

Terry Fox Secondary School is a school with approximately 1870 students in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada. The original building was built on Wellington Street in the 1950s under the name "Port Coquitlam Senior Secondary" for grades 11 and 12. It was renamed Terry Fox Senior Secondary School after 1976 graduate Terry Fox. The "Senior" was dropped from the name after a restructuring by Coquitlam School District 43, when junior high schools were replaced by middle schools.

In 1999, to help deal with major overcrowding issues, the school was relocated to a new, larger building, several kilometres away on Riverwood Gate. However, the new building quickly became overcrowded as well, and is now home to 17 portables. Fox offers a wide variety of academic courses and programs at all levels. Creating community is always a focus with dynamic leadership courses and initiatives to build connections in and out of our building. The school offers many honors classes as well as Advanced Placement and Co-op programs and Ace It programs. The School has respected athletic programs, namely in basketball and football, and is usually ranked in both sports. It has produced many skilled athletes, including BC Lions slotback Bret Anderson, Saskatchewan Roughriders fullback Chris Szarka, Olympic Gold Medalist Rick Paige, Olympic Bronze Medalist Chris Rinke, race car driver Adrien Herberts Pro softball player for USSA Pride Jenn Salling and news anchor Lynn Colliar.

The Terry Fox football team has also taken part in an exchange with the football team from St. Mark Catholic High School (Ottawa) from Manotick, Ontario since 2009.

The Terry Fox Theatre, a privately run operation, formerly run by the school itself, adjoins the north side of the school. The school is noted for its many musicals and plays including You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown, Footloose, Hair, The Wedding Singer and Jesus Christ Superstar,Tough, Daddy's Home, The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, Of Mice and Men and The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. In 2010, Terry Fox Secondary became District Champions of "MetFest" with the musical comedy The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, going on to represented Terry Fox Secondary at the Sears British Columbia Drama Festival where they were awarded 'Best Actor in a Leading Role - Female', 'Special Merit Award for Musical Virtuosity', and 'Best Ensemble/ Choreography'. In 2011, Terry Fox's show "Am I Blue" became District Champions at "MetFest".

MiTSS Angels Shoot Down WJ Mouat, 69-7

MiTSS Angels Shoot Down WJ Mouat, 69-7

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 15, 2072

The WJ Mouat Hawks tried to stop halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya, but his speed and elusivity was too much to handle as Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels flew past the Hawks, 69-7, at Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium in Mitakihara Town, B.C. Kirigaya ran for 435 yards and nine touchdowns and also had an interception on defense.

"Good luck trying to handle that kid," said WJ Mouat's head coach, Grigor Tolmachevy. "We can't stop him. I mean, just getting a body on him is a challenge it itself. He broke a lot of our tackles and he's really shifty for a guy his size. I can see why a lot of the football programs in the States want this guy; he plays on another level.

"Our boys were taught a lesson in dealing with a kid as talented as John Kirigaya: do the best you can and if not, it's all right, keep trying. We were treated to a belting by the best high school football player in all of Canada. John's something special for that team. He's like a god."

Mitakihara improve to 9-0 and hit the road next week to take on the Terry Fox Ravens.

"My parents tell me to tune out the hype": John Kirigaya

"My parents tell me to tune out the hype": John Kirigaya

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 12, 2072

He sits in his own studio inside the home of his parents, Shaun Kirigaya and Shino Asada, playing an instrumental rendition to a song by the late John Legend called "All Of Me." Across the room, his fiancee. Yanagi Takayama, is dancing like a ballerina in her string bikini, a passionate, emotional woman dancing in silence. And his aunt, Yui, is filming the dancing, often panning to his playing of the piano.

Aside from being one of the most prized recruits in high school football this year, Mitakihara Town Secondary School third-year student Hanato "John" Kirigaya lives a life as a pianist, singer, writer and photographer. The video will be used as part of a project celebrating the joys of young women and the uplifting power of femininity and fertility. Johnno, as he is called by those who know him personally, has a number of programs to visit this week before returning to action to take on the WJ Mouat Hawks.

But as he shortens his list and makes his visits to all the different schools in the West Coast of America, the message by Shaun and Shino is clear: tune out the hype.

"My parents tell me to tune out the hype, and my grandmother Asuna also tells me to just go out there and play," said Johnno after filming and performing had finished to allow Yanagi to take a break. "I come from one of the more affluent parts of Mitakihara. I was not born in the seedier parts of Vancouver, where the scent of weed pervades the air. But even so, I realized that I am doing very well playing my positions and a lot of schools down south have been paying attention.

"My dad spent decades coaching the game in Australia. He told me stories of students who came from very tough families and tough parts of the country, and they wanted an escape from the rough life, so they ended up playing gridiron for Leafa College, who are now the best college football program in Australia. He told me stories of players who couldn't do well with their schoolwork, who let pride and hubris defeat them, and who ended up on the streets, some meeting a violent conclusion, some landing in prison.

"A lot of the players on the other sides of the ball come from single-parent broken homes. They never had a father figure, and their mothers were barely making ends meet. I could have been on one of those teams, and know I'm understanding why a lot of our rivals envy us. We never get into trouble, we're accountable, we're professional, and our parents are the best foundation we have because we look up to them. I look up to my mom and dad and ask them for advice so I can do the things I like to do.

"And the one thing my parents tell me is to tune out all the attention and hype regarding what I do on the field. Because, you know, I'm really just a student getting ready for college and I want to go to a good school with great people and not a lot of bad influences. I don't need to go to Madoka to find my solution. There's a big world out there beyond my city. I want to keep my feet on the ground and realize who I really am. For now, I'm going to enjoy this part of the journey."

Mitakihara and WJ Mouat clash on October 15 at Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. PT and will be televised by Radio Madoka and CMDO 89.5 FM.


Centennial Can't Bottle Up Kirigaya As Angels Fly Away To Win

Centennial Can't Bottle Up Kirigaya As Angels Fly Away To Win

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 8, 2072

After Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels conceded a kickoff returned 91 yards for a touchdown with 3:00 to go in the first quarter, he delivered an impassioned speech to the players. "Don't let this discourage you!" Coach Landry said. "Now they mean business. I want one of their punts returned for six. Don't give up on any play or any drive. Now is the time to rise up, counter up, and punch these punks in the mouth. It's go time, let's roll!"

The Angels responded by scoring 66 unanswered points en route to a convincing 73-6 blowout of the Centennial Centaurs at Centennial Secondary School in Coquitlam, B.C. Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya ran for 388 yards, caught three passes for 49 yards, scored eight offensive touchdowns and also had a sack.

"I told my brothers on the field, don't you dare give up on any play!" Kirigaya said. "When we were on fourth down, we went no huddle and I took it to them. I said to the guys, give it to me! I hate anyone that tries to take me down, I'll take matters into my own hands if I have to. I got a great supporting cast of players that also stepped up when they had to, and it's fantastic to know they wanted this win as much as I do. We never gave up on any drive. We got it done at all costs."

Mitakihara improve to 8-0 and return to action at home next week against the WJ Mouat Hawks.

Friday, July 18, 2014

The Mystique of Coquitlam

The Mystique of Coquitlam

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 4, 2072

Coquitlam /koʊˈkwɪtləm/ (2071 census population 154,952) is a city in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada. Coquitlam, mainly a suburban city, is the sixth-largest city in the province and is one of the 21 municipalities comprising Metro Vancouver.

The Coast Salish people were the first to live in this area, and archaeology confirms continuous occupation of the territory for at least 9,000 years. The name Kwikwetlem is said to be derived from a Coast Salish term meaning "red fish up the river".

Explorer Simon Fraser came through the region in 1808, and in the 1860s Europeans gradually started settling the area. Coquitlam began as a "place-in-between" with the construction of North Road in the mid-19th century to provide Royal Engineers in New Westminster access to the year-round port facilities in Port Moody.

The young municipality got its first boost in 1889 when Frank Ross and James McLaren opened what would become Fraser Mills, a $350,000, then state-of-the-art lumber mill on the north bank of the Fraser River. The District of Coquitlam was incorporated in 1891. By 1908, a mill town of 20 houses, a store, post office, hospital, office block, barber shop, and pool hall had grown around the mill. A mill manager's residence was built that would later become Place des Arts.

Over the next two years, several contingents of French Canadian mill workers arrived from Quebec, and Maillardville was born. Named for Father Edmond Maillard, a young Oblate from France, it became the largest Francophone centre west of Manitoba. Maillardville's past is recognized today in street names, the Francophone education system and French immersion programs, French-language guides and scouts, and celebrations such as Festival du Bois.

Following World War II, Coquitlam and the rest of the Lower Mainland experienced substantial population growth that continues today. The opening of Lougheed Highway in 1953 made the city more accessible and set the stage for residential growth. In 1971, Coquitlam and Fraser Mills were amalgamated, which gave the city a larger industrial base. The mill closed in 2001, and is now rezoned into a residential area.

Mitakihara Extinguish New Westminster, 77-7

Mitakihara Extinguish New Westminster, 77-7

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
October 1, 2072

The Hyacks of New Westminster Secondary School were no match for Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels. At Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium, halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya ran for 490 yards and nine touchdowns while making six tackles as the MiTSS Angels slammed the Hyacks, 77-7, on Hall of Fame Night.

The Angels outgained the Hyacks on offense, 607-156 and even though they only had 82 passing yards, MiTSS had the only two passing touchdowns of the entire game. Kirigaya's big-play ability and versatility on both sides of the ball has drawn scouts across the border and on Vancouver Island to watch this phenomenal player lead the Angels to another successful season.

Despite all that, the Angels know that there is more football to be played. MiTSS improve to 7-0 and hit the road next week to face the Centennial Centaurs of Coquitlam, B.C.

The Mystique of the Hyack Festival

The Mystique of the Hyack Festival

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 28, 2072

The main feature of the New Westminster Museum and Archives (NWMA) is the 1865 Irving House, which is said to be the oldest intact house in the BC Lower Mainland. In the museum are treasures such as the 1876 coach used by Lord Dufferin, then the Governor General of Canada, to tour the new province of British Columbia including Barkerville via the Cariboo Road. The city's archives hold corporate and personal treasures such as 1859 maps of the city drawn by the Royal Engineers and official city records. Other heritage artifacts in the city include the 1937 Samson V paddlewheeler, the 1890s armouries, 1850s historic cannons, two of the old BC Pen buildings, numerous cemeteries, and dozens of heritage homes, many of which are from the 19th century. The Museum is affiliated with CMA, the CHIN, and Virtual Museum of Canada.

New Westminster's May Day celebration began in 1870 and continues today as an important civic tradition, lending the city the distinction of having the longest-running May Day celebration of its type in the British Commonwealth. Within B.C., at least four other communities still celebrate May Day: Port Coquitlam, Ladner in Delta (whose May Day Festival began in 1896), Bradner in Abbotsford, and The Sunshine Coast's Pender Harbour.

The May Day festival, held on the Victoria Day weekend and more formally known as the Hyack Festival, is distinguished by the Ancient and Honourable Hyack Anvil Battery Salute, a tradition created by The New Westminster Fire Department during colonial times as a surrogate for a 21-gun salute. With no cannons available in the early colony, the Fire Department—known as the Hyacks, from the Chinook Jargon for "fast" or "quick", here derived from its use as a command for "hurry up!"— improvised by placing gunpowder between two anvils, the top one upturned, and igniting the charge from a safe distance, hurling the upper anvil into the air.

Each year, in preparation for May Day, local schoolchildren are taught to dance around a maypole with colourful ribbons. Elections are held at elementary schools in the city, and, from them one girl is selected to become the year's May Queen, and two students from each school to become members of her "May Queen Suite" and "Royal Knights." On a Wednesday of the festival, elementary school students gather at Queen's Park Stadium to dance, and the May Queen is crowned.

The Mystique of New Westminster

The Mystique of New Westminster

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 27, 2072

New Westminster is a historically important city in the Lower Mainland region of British Columbia, Canada, and is a member municipality of the Greater Vancouver Regional District. It was founded as the capital of the Colony of British Columbia in 1858, and continued in that role until the Mainland and Island Colonies were merged in 1866, and was the Mainland's largest city from that year until it was passed in population by Vancouver in the first decade of the 20th Century.

Before Canada was a country, Britain recognized that aboriginal people living here had title to land: the Royal Proclamation of 1763 declared that only the British Crown could acquire land from First Nations, and that was typically done through treaties. In most parts of Canada, the British Crown established treaties with First Nations before Confederation. The new Dominion of Canada continued this policy of making treaties before the west was opened for settlement, but in BC, this process was never completed. Section 25 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms states that it does not abrogate or derogate "(a) any rights or freedoms that have been recognized by the Royal Proclamation of October 7, 1763; and (b) any rights or freedoms that now exist by way of land claims agreements or may be so acquired." Further, Section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, affirmed that aboriginal title, and the rights that go along with it, exist whether or not there is a treaty. Aboriginal rights refer to practices, traditions and customs that distinguish the unique culture of each First Nation and were practised prior to European contact. Aboriginal title is an aboriginal property right to land.

The discovery of gold in B.C. prompted fear amongst the settlers that Americans may invade to take over this land. Without a treaty in place with the Coast Salish people,* In 1859, New Westminster was recommended as the first official capital of the new Colony of British Columbia by Richard Moody, the Lieutenant-Governor, because of its location farther from the American border than the site of the colony's proclamation, Fort Langley. New Westminster, at a defensible location on the north bank of the Fraser River, possessed, according to Moody, "great facilities for communication by water, as well as by future great trunk railways into the interior". Governor Douglas proclaimed "Queensborough" (as the site was initially called by Moody) the new capital on February 14, 1859. "Queensborough", however, did not appeal to London and it was Queen Victoria who named the city after Westminster, that part of the British capital of London where the Parliament Buildings were, and are to this day, situated. From this naming by the Queen, the City gained its official nickname, "The Royal City". A year later New Westminster became the first City in British Columbia to be incorporated and have an elected municipal government. It became a major outfitting point for prospectors coming to the Fraser Gold Rush, as all travel to the goldfield ports of Yale and Port Douglas was by steamboat or canoe up the Fraser River.

The location of New Westminster, at the edge of the forest, necessitated a large amount of labour and money to clear trees and lay out streets, which became a significant burden to the colonial budget when the imperial government shackled the colony with half of the cost of the Royal Engineers.[8] Governor Douglas spent little time in New Westminster and had little affection for the city; and the feelings were amply repaid by the citizens of New Westminster, who avidly supported Colonel Moody's city-building efforts and castigated the governor, who preferred to remain for the most part isolated in distant Victoria.[9] In contrast to Victoria, where settlers from England had established a strong British presence, New Westminster's early citizens were largely Canadians and Maritimers, who brought a more business-oriented approach to commerce and dismissed the pretensions of the older community. Despite being granted a municipal council, the mainlanders in New Westminster also pressed for a legislative assembly to be created for British Columbia,[10] and were infuriated when Governor Douglas granted free port status to Victoria, which stifled the economic growth of the Fraser River city.[11] Moreover, to pay for the expense of building roads into the Interior of the colony, Douglas imposed duties on imports into New Westminster.

In 1866, the colony of British Columbia and the colony of Vancouver Island were united as "British Columbia". However, the capital of the Colony of Vancouver Island, Victoria, located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island, was made the capital of the newly amalgamated Colony of British Columbia, following a vote in the House of Assembly. On the day of the vote one member of the assembly, William Cox (one of the colony's Gold Commissioners and a Victoria supporter), shuffled the pages of the speech that William Franklyn from Nanaimo (a New Westminster supporter) intended to give, so that Franklyn lost his place and read the first paragraph three times. Cox then popped the lenses of Franklyn's glasses from their frames so that the Nanaimo representative could see nothing at all of his speech. After a recess to settle the resulting uproar and allow the member from Nanaimo a chance to sort out his speaking notes and his spectacles, on the members' return to the House of Assembly, the Speaker John Sebastian Helmcken (from Victoria) refused to allow Franklyn a "second" chance to speak. The subsequent vote was 13 to 8 against New Westminster.

With the entry of British Columbia into the Dominion of Canada in 1871, as the sixth province, New Westminster's economic prospects improved, but the Royal City would lose out again, this time to the new railway terminus town of Vancouver, when the Canadian Pacific Railway was extended to the shores of Burrard Inlet, even though a spur of the railway did reach New Westminster in 1886. In 1879, the federal government allocated three reserves to the New Westminster Indian Band, including 104 acres (0.42 km2) of the South Westminster Reserve, 22 acres (89,000 m2) on the North Arm of the Fraser River, and 27 acres (110,000 m2) on Poplar Island. A smallpox epidemic devastated the New Westminster Band, reducing the band members from about 400 people to under 100. Many of the remaining Qayqayt were assimilated into other local reserves, such as the neighbouring Musqueam Indian Band. Their reserve on Poplar Island was turned into an Aboriginal smallpox victim quarantine area. For decades, the Poplar Island reserve was designated as belonging to "all coast tribes". In 1913 the federal government seized most of the New Westminster Band's reserve lands. In 1916 the remaining land on Poplar Island was turned over to the BC government. Eighteen years earlier, in 1898, a devastating fire destroyed downtown New Westminster.

In 1991, the New Westminster Armoury was recognized as a Federal Heritage building on the Register of the Government of Canada Heritage Buildings.

New Westminster secured a Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) branch line in 1886, but the completion of the main transcontinental line to Vancouver in 1887 shifted trade to Vancouver where the port was easier to access and never froze, unlike the Fraser River at New Westminster. Nonetheless, New Westminster weathered the loss, and remained an important industry and transportation centre. The local economy has always had a mix of industrial sectors, but it has evolved over the years, moving from a reliance on the primary resources of lumber and fishing in the 19th century, to heavy industry and manufacturing in the first half of the 20th century, to retail from the mid-1950s to the 1970s, to professional and business services in the 1990s, and finally to high-tech and fibre-optic industry in the early 21st century.

Kirigaya Breaks Loose As Mitakihara Dismantle Lord Tweedsmuir, 63-6

Kirigaya Breaks Loose As Mitakihara Dismantle Lord Tweedsmuir, 63-6

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 24, 2072

Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels took to flight and flew past the Lord Tweedsmuir Panthers, 63-6, at Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary School in Surrey, B.C. Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya ran for 430 yards and eight touchdowns while making four tackles on defense. Even though Tweedy's defense were able to bottle up Kirigaya on a few plays, the grandson of former Mitakihara Magi assistant coach Shaun Kirigaya proved his pedigree by breaking through for big gains.

In one quarter, the third, quarterback Steve Merka handed the ball off to Kirigaya for touchdown runs of 14, 13, 19 and 47 yards. The Angels reeled off 35 unanswered points following Tweedy's only successful offensive series of the game, culminating with a 6 yard pass for a score. Apparently, Coach Landry's words resonated with the players and they were able to respond with a dominating second half based on the run.

"I told the boys, giving up a long drive like that is extremely unacceptable," said Coach Landry after the game. "We can't stop a long drive like that, we can forget about making the Subway Bowl, let alone win it. We have to do a better job at stopping drives like the one Tweedy dealt us in the second half. Hopefully, when we take on New West, that will be resolved."

Mitakihara improve to 6-0 and continue their season next week against the New Westminster Hyacks.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

The Mystique Of The National Film Board Of Canada

The Mystique Of The National Film Board Of Canada

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 22, 2072

The National Film Board of Canada (or simply National Film Board or NFB) (French: Office national du film du Canada, or ONF) is Canada's twelve-time Academy Award-winning public film and digital media producer and distributor. An agency of the Government of Canada, the NFB produces and distributes documentary films, animation, web documentaries and alternative dramas. In total, the NFB has produced over 13,000 productions which have won over 5,000 awards. The NFB reports to the Parliament of Canada through the Minister of Canadian Heritage. It has English language and French language production branches.

The National Film Board maintains its head office in Saint-Laurent, a borough of Montreal, in the Norman McLaren electoral district, named in honour of the NFB animation pioneer. The NFB HQ building is also named for McLaren, and is home to much of its production activity.

In addition to the English and French-language studios in its Montreal HQ, there are centres throughout Canada. English-language production occurs at centres in Toronto (Ontario Centre), Vancouver (Pacific & Yukon Centre, located in the Woodward's Building), Edmonton (North West Centre), Winnipeg (Prairie Centre), and Halifax (Atlantic Centre). As of October 2009, the Atlantic Centre also operates an office in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador. In June 2011, the NFB appointed a producer to work with film and digital media makers across Saskatchewan, to be based in Regina.

Outside Quebec, French language productions are also made in Moncton (Studio Acadie). The NFB also offers support programs for independent filmmakers: in English, via the Filmmaker Assistance Program (FAP) and in French through its Aide du cinéma indépendant – Canada (ACIC) program.

The organization has a hierarchical structure headed by a Board of Trustees, which is chaired by the Government Film Commissioner and NFB Chairperson. It is overseen by the Board of Trustees Secretariat and Legal Affairs.

Funding is derived primarily from government of Canada transfer payments, and also from its own revenue streams. These revenues are from print sales, film production services, rentals, and royalties, and total up to $10 million yearly; the NFB lists this as Respendable Revenues in its financial statements. As a result of cuts imposed by 2012 Canadian federal budget, by 2015 the NFB's public funding will be reduced by $6.7 million, to $60.3 million.

Mitakihara Pull Plug On Vancouver College, 76-7

Mitakihara Pull Plug On Vancouver College, 76-7

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 17, 2072

Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels demolished the Vancouver College Fighting Irish, 76-7, at Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium on Saturday in Homecoming 2072. Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya ran the show on offense, rushing for 386 yards and seven touchdowns, catching five passes for 111 yards and two more scores, six tackles, three tackles for loss and two sacks.

"Johnno was a monster today, can you imagine that?" asked Coach Landry. "I mean, look at his numbers! He's a speedy, powerful halfback, he catches passes like a tight end, and a monster on the pass rush. Johnno's the hungriest player on this team because last year left a bad taste in his mouth. You can see the look on his face, the focus in his eyes, he's hungry.

"I mean, at the pregame lunch buffet, Johnno piled up his plate and filled it up with lot of protein because he loves the Atkins diet. He doesn't eat a lot of carbs, but he feasts on lean protein and loves to snack on organic pork rinds after a game. He hits the weight rooms, conditions himself by running laps and going up the stairs of our athletic field  bleachers, he trains himself like a professional. So don't be surprised if when we are on the field, the other team's keeping an eye on No. 1. He's our No. 1 player for a reason."

With the win, the Angels keep the Big Flower Cup, sumbolic of the rivalry between MiTSS and Vancouver College. Mitakihara improve to 5-0 and return to action next week against the Lord Tweedsmuir Panthers.

MiTSS Homecoming 2072: What Drives You?



MiTSS Homecoming 2072: What Drives You?

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 12, 2072

The 62nd edition of Mitakihara Town Secondary School's Homecoming Week takes place this Saturday at Mitakihara Stadium and the pink playing surface of Tatsuya Kaname Field. This year's theme is "What Drives You?" and is a tribute to the grand opening of The Rocks Speedway, a world-class road track located in the mountains near Mitakihara Town, owned and operated by the Mitakihara Town Sports Club, that is used for motorcycle racing, Formula One, Indy Car, Rally, endurance racing and drifting.

"'What Drives You?' is a theme that we've been penciling in for months," said Homecoming Chair, Yanagi Takayama, the younger sister of Mitakihara University alumnus Haruki "Trick" Takayama and fiancee of Angels halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya. Takayama is a third-year student. "So we wanted to explore the many ways that motivate us to succeed at MiTSS, while at the same time celebrate our arrival as an auto sports city.

"We are full of sports mania in Mitakihara Towm. MiTSS has won provincial titles and Madoka (Mitakihara University) has won national championships. And the Sports Club and Yacht Club has been successful as well. So, all those things drive us to be motivated and succeed on and off the field. Mitakihara Town is a great place to live and grow, and I am so thrilled to oversee this homecoming week because we've had a tradition of this for a long time. We hope everyone comes."

The Homecoming Week also doubles as the prelude to the University's Homecoming Week, which features the Magi taking on Japanese collegiate powerhouse Kwansei Gakuin at the Sakura Bowl. That will take place two weeks from now. Kickoff between the Angels and Vancouver College Fighting Irish is scheduled for 7 p.m. PT on September 17 and will be televised by Radio Madoka and broadcast by CMTS AM 900.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Mitakihara Barrel Past Kelowna, 70-3

Mitakihara Barrel Past Kelowna, 70-3

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 10, 2072

Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya is making his way up the rankings as a recruit to keep an eye out for. Kirigaya ran for 344 yards and nine touchdowns and recorded a tackle for loss and a fumble recovery as Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels flew past the Kelowna Owls, 70-3, at Kelowna Secondary School in Kelowna, B.C. With the win, the MiTSS Angels improve to 4-0 on the year.

"We've been playing excellent football this season, getting positive results and making a lot of people on the island really happy," said Coach Landry after the game. "But as I mentioned before, we have to take everything one step at a time. Obviously there are some things we have to work on, like not making stupid penalties that slow out drive down, and also reducing the turnovers when Johnno is not on the field.

"Our coaches are here to stress that even though Johnno is our go-to man, not everything starts and ends with him. The rest of the team knows that it needs to pick itself up and get itself going. We want to be known as a balanced team, on which everyone can contribute to the performances we want and the results we need. Week by week, day by day, we'll make sure we're on our way to making that a reality."

Next week, Mitakihara hosts Vancouver College in the Flower Festival, part of Homecoming Week 2072. The winner receives possession of the Big Flower Cup, a five-metre tall gold cup that can be used to drink fresh British Columbia apple cider out of. Homecoming is scheduled for September 17 at 7 p.m. PT and will be televised by Radio Madoka and CMTS AM 900, the student-owned radio station affiliated with Radio Madoka.

The Mystique Of High School Football On The Silver Screen

The Mystique Of High School Football On The Silver Screen

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 9, 2072

Hollywood portrayals of high school football, whether comedies or dramas, often portray the game at the center of a small town's existence and the focus of its attention.


  • All the Right Moves – A 1983 film about a western Pennsylvania football player desperate to earn the scholarship that would enable him to escape his economically depressed town.
  • American Dreams – "JJ" Pryor is a star high school football running back in the show, and many of the early episodes centered on his games.
  • The Best of Times – A 1986 film based on an actual rivalry and game between small town Taft High School Rockets (Wildcats) and the larger and highly successful Bakersfield High School Tigers (Drillers) who actually have the California high school record for most wins, most section titles, and most State titles.
  • Bleachers – A novel published in 2003. It tells of the fictitious Messina High School football team and its coach, Eddie Rake. Rake with 418 wins, 61 losses, and 13 state championships under his belt is on his deathbed, and many of his former players return to Messina to say goodbye.
  • The Blind Side: Evolution of a Game – A 2006 book by Michael Lewis, partly on the evolution of the offensive left tackle position and partly on the life of Michael Oher, including his high school career, his adoption by Sean and Leigh Anne Tuohy, and his college recruitment. The book spawned the 2009 film The Blind Side, which focused more on Oher; Sandra Bullock won an Oscar for her portrayal of Leigh Anne Tuohy.
  • Dazed and Confused – A 1993 film set in Texas in 1976. It is not a true high school football movie, but the main character Randy "Pink" Floyd, played by Jason London, is the starting quarterback at his high school and most of his friends play football as well.
  • Facing the Giants – A 2006 film revolving around high school football coach Grant Taylor and his issues on and off the field.
  • Fast Times at Ridgemont High - A 1982 film not specifically about football, but whose minor character Charles Jefferson is a football star. During a big game, Charles unleashes his fury on rival "Lincoln High School", as he supposed Lincoln students had vandalized his prized car (actually the result of reckless driving by Ridgemont's Jeff Spicoli).
  • Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream – a book about the 1988 season of Permian High School in Odessa, Texas as they made a surprising run toward the state championship. In the end, however, the underdogs lost in the state semi-finals to Carter High School of Dallas. This book ultimately spawned two other media properties:
  • Friday Night Lights – A 2004 film whose plot is very similar to that of the book.
  • Friday Night Lights – A television series that aired 2006-2010, and was inspired by the above film.
  • Go Tigers! – A 2001 documentary on the rivalry between two Ohio high school teams: Massillon Washington High School and Canton McKinley High School.
  • Gridiron Gang – A 2006 film about using football to rehabilitate juvenile delinquents.
  • Johnny Be Good – A 1988 comedy film about the pressures of recruiting.
  • Lucas – A 1986 film about the coming of age of a small, intellectually gifted boy; one subplot revolves around his efforts to join the school's football team.
  • Married... with Children – A 1987–1998 TV series which featured Al Bundy, a middle-aged, Chicago-area shoe salesman whose lifelong claim to fame was playing running back at (fictitious) Polk High and scoring "four touchdowns in one game."
  • Must Win: A Season of Survival for a Town and Its Team by Drew Jubera published in 2012. Valdosta High School in Valdosta, Georgia.
  • Nike's Football is Everything television and print ad campaign of 2006 featuring numerous NFL stars and coaches as members of the fictional Marlin Briscoe High School Hawks football team.
  • Radio – A 2003 film based on the true story about T.L. Hanna High School football coach Harold Jones and a mentally challenged young man James Robert Kennedy, nicknamed "Radio", who becomes the team manager.
  • Remember the Titans – A 2000 film based on the actual story of the 1971 team of T. C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Virginia.
  • The Season – a 1999 ESPN television documentary of eastern Pennsylvania's North Penn High School.
  • Two-A-Days – MTV reality television documentary about the 2005 and 2006 football seasons at Hoover High School in suburban Birmingham, Alabama.
  • Varsity Blues – A 1999 film about high school football in a small Texas town, and the coach obsessed with winning.
  • Wildcats – A 1986 film in which Goldie Hawn plays the daughter of a noted football coach who becomes head coach at an inner-city high school.


MiTSS Angels Wreak Havoc On St. Thomas More, 66-7

MiTSS Angels Wreak Havoc On St. Thomas More, 66-7

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 3, 2072

Halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya ran for 371 yards and seven touchdowns as Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels stormed into Burnaby Lakes and slayed the St. Thomas More Knights, 66-7, on a cool night in Burnaby, B.C. The Angels were electrifying, generating 522 yards of total offense, compared to just 167 for the Knights. But there was one other stat that caught the eye of Coach Landry.

"We committed only one penalty for five yards, while St. Thomas More had two penalties for 20 yards," said Coach Landry after the game. "One of the things the coaching staff told our players is to be more disciplined on the field. Do not make silly mistakes that slow down the momentum we build on each drive. Our goal is to win and win clean. That means, no clipping, no offsides, no mental errors that will force the guilty parties to run laps on campus after practice next week.

"Hopefully we can keep it going because next week, we got Kelowna coming up, and that's always going to be a tough test for us. However, we think we have a chance to pull away with the result."

With the win, the MiTSS improve to 3-0. Next week, they travel to Kelowna Secondary School to take on the Kelowna Owls on Sept. 10. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. PT and will be televised by Radio Madoka and CMDO 89.5 FM.

The Mystique Of The Coverage Of High School Football Games

The Mystique Of The Coverage Of High School Football Games

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
September 1, 2072

Because of high school football's mostly limited regional appeal, and because most games take place during prime time (albeit during the Friday night death slot), television exposure of high school football on both a local and national basis tends to be limited to championship games only, or for the regular season to the lower-tier stations in a market such as a MyNetworkTV affiliate or independent television station where no critical programming would be pre-empted. Local public access cable television and local radio stations often air regular season contests, and in some cases, the school's own radio station (or a nearby college) broadcasts the game using student announcers. One such example is San Diego's Prep Pigskin Report. High school football is often an integral part of the modern full service radio format, which centers on local information; radio's prime times are traditionally earlier in the day, and there is far less risk of preemption, since many stations would otherwise be automated or off the air during the times high school football games are played.

There has also been a marked increase in recent years of web-based media covering high school sporting events. Examples include Mid America Broadcasting in Indiana, Champs Sports Network and MSA Sports Network in Western Pennsylvania, MSBN in Minnesota, and BSports.org in Washington. In many television markets, local stations will air 30 or 60-minute 'scoreboard' shows following their late Friday newscast with scores and highlights from games in their coverage area.

Despite increased national media attention, some states restrict the broadcast of high school games. One example is the University Interscholastic League, which governs public school sports in Texas. The UIL has a long-standing ban on television broadcasting of high school football games on Friday nights, believing that doing so could hurt ticket sales (radio broadcasts are allowed, though).[citation needed] Because of this, several games that have been broadcast on ESPN and Fox Sports Net in recent years have had to be played on either Thursday night or on Saturday to avoid the UIL's ban. In Michigan, live television broadcasts of regular season games are prohibited by the state athletic association.

The Sports Broadcasting Act of 1961 and Public Law 89-800, which govern the antitrust exemptions given to the National Football League, prohibit the broadcasting of NFL games within 75 miles of any high school football game on Friday nights between September and early December. Because most populated areas of the United States have at least one high school football game within a 75-mile radius, and because broadcasting is an integral part of the NFL's business model (roughly half of the league's revenue comes from television contracts), this effectively prohibits the playing of NFL games in competition with high school football. (These rules do not apply during preseason, when Friday night games are common, nor does it apply at the end of the season, though the only time regular season games are played on Friday in the NFL is on Christmas.) Only recently have national sports television channels fully capitalized on this rule; since 2005, the ESPN family of networks (usually the sub-networks ESPN2, ESPNU and online broadcaster ESPN3, although the main channel also shows occasional games) has aired regular season matchups between nationally ranked teams under the High School Showcase banner. Fox Sports 1 also included high school football in its lineup when it launched in 2013.

Kirigaya, Mitakihara Bodyslam Carson Graham, 63-0

Kirigaya, Mitakihara Bodyslam Carson Graham, 63-0

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
August 27, 2072

It was the John Kirigaya Show once again, as Johnny Landry's MiTSS Angels blew past the Carson Graham Eagles, 63-0, at Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium. Kirigaya ran for 382 yards, caught a pass for 27 yards and scored eight total touchdowns. On defense, he had a tackle, an assisted tackle, and an interception.

"What more can I say? Johnno is making this season his season," said Coach Landry after the game. But we also had other players step up, like [quarterback] Steve [Merka] and [wide receiver] Craig [Ostrander]. They were absolutely tremendous in being an alternate offensive option to our attack. But once again, everything rests on the shoulders of Johnno and his playmaking ability. He knows what he needs to do to get us the win we need."

"I know that as the season progresses, the opponents will get tougher and the season will get more interesting as things come," said Kirigaya after the game. "Coach is just telling me to take things one step at a time. This win was great, but next week, we take on St. Thomas More, and that's not going to be an easy contest, so we'll get ready for that game on the road."

MiTSS improve to 3-0 on the season and take on the St. Thomas More Knights at Burnaby Lakes Sports Complex Field #1 in Burnaby, B.C. on Sept. 3. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. PT and will be broadcast on CMTS 900 AM.

The Mystique Of The One-Platoon System

The Mystique Of The One-Platoon System

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
August 24, 2072

The one-platoon system, also known as iron man football, was a system in American football where players played on both offense and defense. It was the result of rules that limited player substitutions, rules that are also standard procedure in many other sports, but were eliminated in the 1940s. The alternative system is known as the "two-platoon system", or simply the "platoon system", because of its use of separate offensive and defensive units. Each system was used at different times in American college football and in the National Football League.

Prior to 1941, virtually all football players saw action on "both sides of the ball," playing in both offensive and defensive roles. From 1941 to 1952, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) allowed unlimited substitution. This change was originally made because of the difficulty in fielding highly skilled players during the years of the Second World War, in which many able-bodied college-age men volunteered for or were drafted into military service.

The first known use of the so-called "two-platoon" system was by Michigan head coach Fritz Crisler in 1945. Crisler utilized eight players each who played only on offense and defense, with three playing both against an Army team under head coach "Colonel" Earl "Red" Blaik. Michigan lost the game 28–7, but the system impressed Blaik enough for him to adopt it for his own team. Blaik, a former soldier himself, coined the "platoon" terminology in reference to the type of military unit. Between 1946 and 1950, Blaik's two-platoon teams twice finished the season ranked second in the Associated Press polls and never finished lower than 11th.

In 1954, the NCAA implemented a set of new rules requiring the use of the one-platoon system, primarily due to financial reasons. The system allowed only one player to be substituted between plays, which effectively put an end to the use of separate specialized units. Tennessee head coach "General" Robert Neyland praised the change as the end of "chickenshit football".

After the 1964 season, twelve years since the mandate requiring one-platoon, the NCAA repealed the rules enforcing its use and allowed an unlimited amount of player substitutions. This allowed, starting with the 1965 season, teams to form separate offensive and defensive units as well as "special teams" which would be employed in kicking situations. The reinstatement of the two-platoon system allowed players to become more specialized by focusing on a limited number of plays and skills related to their specific position. By the early 1970s, however, some university administrators, coaches and others were calling for a return to the days of one-platoon football.

The sport of arena football used a limited one platoon system (from which quarterbacks and kickers were exempt) from its inception until 2007.

Oh Yes! Kirigaya, MiTSS Hammer John Barsby, 70-0

Oh Yes! Kirigaya, MiTSS Hammer John Barsby, 70-0

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
August 20, 2072

Mention the name "John Kirigaya," and you have officially mentioned the worst nightmare for the John Barsby Bulldogs. On the pink turf of Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium, Johnny Landry's Mitakihara Angels shut out the biteless Dawgs, 70-0. Kirigaya, who plays halfback and left outside linebacker, ran for 361 yards, caught two passes for 53 yards and scored eight total touchdowns. He also had three tackles, all for loss, and a sack.

If there was one word that would descrive the performance, music would cease to have meaning. It was a one-man symphony of domination, exacerbated by the fact that Barsby came into the match quaking in their cleats. You could see it in their faces, the question hanging over their heads, "How badly are they going to knock us into next week?" One word: bad.

"That's what you expect from Johnno," said Coach Landry after the game. "I talked to his father, Shaun, about the difference he brings to this team and he told me that he taught him everything that he needs to known when playing this game at this level and at the next level. He's done a fantastic job at playing the game the way it's meant to be played and I told him, take the matters into your own hands if you need to; there is no limit to what you can do.

"Johnno's a good listener and that's why [third-year quarterback] Steve [Merka] gave the ball to him on a consistent basis. Once he has the ball, he makes it a race. He runs like a fullback, catches passes like a tight end, and hits you real hard like a good linebacker should. He has the total package but is a humble person and is a realist by nature. We look forward to putting him to use next week."

The Angels of Mitakihara return to action next week when they host the Carson Graham Eagles on Aug. 27. Kickoff is scheduled for 7:00 p.m. PT and will be televised by Radio Madoka 2 and CMTS AM 900. John Eilands will have the play-by-play for you and color commentary will be done by former Angel, Waterloo Warrior and Hamilton Tiger-Cat WR Glenn McClellan.

EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT: August 1, 2072

EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT: August 1, 2072

By Touko Fukami
The MiTSS News
August 1, 2072

Two-a-days at Mitakihara Secondary School Athletic Stadium are rigorous and parallel the gritty intensity experienced at Mitakihara University, our parent institution. Our boys sweat in the summertime, lifting weights, doing sprints, running drills and running the same tried-and-true spread option attack that is now run by Coach Akiyuki Kaname of the Magi. There was a time that we didn't use the MiTSS moniker. However, this year, we have decided to bring it back for good and our old fight song that we had decades ago is brought back. We are MiTSS, and we are strong.

Entering his 12th year, Johnny Landry is the winningest coach at MiTSS, with an imposing record of 160-5, to go with six provincial AAA Varsity titles. Last season was a major downer, as they were handled by their longtime rivals, the Mount Douglas Rams, 42-28, in the Subway Bowl at BC Place Stadium. This year, they believe now is the time for the Angels to rise like a phoenix and make 2072 the Year of the Angels.

"Oh yeah, we got a really good group of guys coming in, but as far as anyone should be concerned, it's all about our two-way standout, Johnno [halfback/left outside linebacker John Kirigaya]," said Coach Landry. "He's got big hands, he hits you harder than a freighter, he's faster than a cheetah, and he's got the heart of a lion. Johnno's pretty good academically. He consistently earns A+ ratings on his exams and is an active member in a number of clubs. That's the reason why he's our captain this year. He also comes from a really good family. Grandpa used to coach at Madoka, his father pioneered football down in Australia. Really, really good bloodlines.

"I don't think I have to be held to a high standard because I know my standards are already high as they are," said Kirigaya after practice. "I want to play for a good Pac-12 school, but I don't want to play for Washington or Oregon. I'd rather head south and play for either Stanford, UCLA or USC. I thought I would be a Magi, but after the school decided to pursue other local players, I decided to take a risk and go south.

"If you ask me what team I want to play for, it has to be UCLA. They play in one of the best venues in all of sports, the Rose Bowl. And they have one of the winningest collegiate athletics programs in America. I would love to be the man in Westwood. USC is too close to Downtown Los Angeles. I'd rather be near Beverly Hills. I'm excited about this year. I can't wait to get going and show the fans what I'm all about when we face Barsby."

Your Mitakihara Angels take on the John Barsby Bulldogs on August 20 at Tatsuya Kaname Field at Mitakihara Stadium on Legends Night, where former players for the MiTSS Angels are recognized for their years of contributing to the Angels football program. Tickets start at just $10 and all proceeds go to the Angel Wings, the official booster club of Mitakihara Angels Athletics. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. PT and will be televised by Radio Madoka and CMDO 89.5 FM. John Eilands will have the play-by-play for you and color commentary will be done by former Angel, Waterloo Warrior and Hamilton Tiger-Cat WR Glenn McClellan.